Bruger:Rsteen/Kladde6

This is a list of early Danish steamships, entering service in Denmark between 1819 and 1869. The list is based on the three volumes of Danish steamship history by Holger Munchaus Petersen, Danske dampskibe indtil 1870, following the chronology of his list in volume III. As the duchies of Schleswig and Duchy of Holstein were part of the Danish realm until 1864, the list also includes steamships serving there.

ShipsRediger

The year shown in the list is the year of entering service in Denmark. Some ships served in other countries before that. Additional information - primarily builder's numbers - has been provided by the Miramar Ship Index (www.miramarshipindex.org.nz) through a Wikipedia partnership.

Year Name Builder Tonnage Description Illustration
1819 Caledonia John Wood & Co, Port Glasgow 101 Paddle steamer, built for the Caledonia Steam Boat Co and launched July 27 1815. Bought by James Watt junior in April 1817 and fitted with new engines from Boulton and Watt, where he was a partner. In May 1819, she was bought by the Danish advocate (and later diplomat) Steen Andersen Bille (1781-1860), who had obtained a royal concession for transport of mail and passengers between Copenhagen and Kiel. In 1822 she was sold to Lauritz Nicolai Hvidt - also of Copenhagen - and the ship was broken up there in 1841.[1][2]  
1821 Maskinbaaden Next to nothing is known about this vessel. It was advertised in the Copenhagen daily Adresseavisen in 1821 and 1822 with scheduled tours on the Sound to Bellevue and Charlottenlund. Maskinbaaden may not even have been its real name, it just means that it was an engine-driven vessel.[3]
1824 Prindsesse Wilhelmine Richard Pearson & Co, Thorne 120 Paddle steamer, originally named the Kingston and built in 1821 for the Hull Steam Packet Company, which was formed by investors from Thorne, including the builder, Pearson. She operated on the Hull-London route until 1823, when a larger ship took over. She was then used between Hull and Antwerpen until March 8, 1824, when she was bought by the Danish merchant Frederik August Hagen for £5,000. In Denmark she operated on the route beween Copenhagen, Travemünde and Lübeck as well as doing pleasure cruises on the Sound. On November 25 1833 she was sold to Øresunds Toldkammers Fattigkasse in Elsinore. Got new engines in 1838, but in 1844 the engines were removed for use in the Hertha. The hull was sold to Jens Steffen Kaas of Copenhagen, who rebuilt her as a three-mastet schooner, named Hydra. She was wrecked in March 1870, but refloated and sold to Swedish owners on October 25, 1870. Registered to L. Cramér of Rone, Gotland as the Maria Karolina in 1871-1877.[4][5]  
1824 Kiel Thomas Brockleby, Deptford 161 Built by Thomas Brocklebank in Deptford as the Eagle in 1820, and the following year she became part of the fleet of the General Steam Navigation Co., serving between London and Margate. In 1824 she was sold to the Danish Navy, arriving in Copenhagen on June 4, 1824. She was intended for the personal use of King Frederik VI - renamed the Kiel - but was also used on occation as a ferry across the Great Belt and Little Belt, relieving the normal ferries. In 1844 she was lent to the harbour commission of Glückstadt, and when that part of Denmark rebelled in 1848, she became part of the navy of Schleswig-Holsten. After the first Schleswig War she was handed back to the Danish Navy, arriving in Copenhagen August 12, 1851. Was put up for sale in 1851 and 1852, but not sold and instead her engines were taken out and she was remeasured as a sailing ship in 1853. Sold to private owners in Aalborg in 1865 and renamed Frederik 6's Minde. Served on until 1897, when she was reported as broken up.[6][7][8]  
1825 Jylland John B. 22 A small steamer built in 1823 as the Dandy. Sold to Opfeldt of Denmark in 1825, renamed to Jylland and employed on a route between Copenhagen and Aarhus. Opfeldt apparently ran out of funds in 1826 and the ship went to the Elbe based in Altona. By 1843 it was still there, owned by xxx and having its original name Dandy. By 1845 the vessel was no longer in the list of Danish ships.[9][10]
1908 Paso de Obligado 506 682 Three steamers for the Marina Mercante Argentina S. A.. Paso de Obligado was sold to French owners in 1920 and renamed Collobrieres, but in 1929 it went back to Argentina with its original name. Discarded around 1947. Paso de la Patria was also sold to France in 1920, renamed Cavalaira and in 1925 Ivolina. Wrecked in 1926. Paso de Cuevas went to France in 1918 as the Carnoules and then to Uruguay 1928 as first the Ciudad del Salto and in 1934 the Enrique J. Vidal. She was back in Argentina in 1944 as the Cupalen, with a last spell in 1969 as the Don Maximo. Last mentioned in 1978.[11]
1908 Paso de la Patria 508 682
1909 Paso de Cuevas 507 682
1909 HMS Amazon 471 986 Thornycroft delivered one of the two Tribal-class destroyers in the Admiralty's 1906-07 Programme. Sold in 1919 and broken up.[12]  
1909 HMS Nubian 501 985 Thornycroft delivered one of the five Tribal-class destroyers in the Admiralty's 1907-08 Programme. The ship ended her career under the original name in October 1916, when her bows were destroyed by a torpedo. The midsection and stern were joined to the bows of the mine-damaged Zulu, and the resulting ship became HMS Zubian.  
1909 Paso de San Lorenzo 509 703 Two steamers for the Marina Mercante Argentina S. A.. The Paso de San Lorenzo went to France in 1918 as the Cuers and back to Argentina in 1924 as the Jenny and later in 1924 the Apipe. Foundered and sank in 1940. The Paso de Martín García went to France in 1918 as the Cogolin and back to Argentina in 1924 as the Amalita. In 1926 she got her original name back and kept it, even during a spell in Paraguay in 1937-1939. Deleted in 1964.[13][14]
Paso de Martín García 510 703
1909 Shutung 515 136 Tug, built for British owners.
1910 HMS Savage 519 897 Thornycroft delivered one of the 16 Beagle-class destroyers in the Admiralty's 1908-09 Programme. Broken up in 1921.[15]
1910 Miranda 521 793 Large yacht for Lord Leith of Fyvie. Taken over by the Royal Navy in 1915 and renamed Miranda II. In 1919 taken over by the Corporation of the Trinity House and named Patricia. Renamed as Patricia II in 1938 and Vestal in 1939. Sold to the government of Iraq in 1947. Broken up in Belgium in 1949.
1910 Vulcano 535 151 A minelayer for the Navy of Portugal. Discarded in the late 1940s.[16]
1910 Arabia 561 236 A paddle-steamer passenger ship, registered in Egypt by T. Cook and Son.
1911 HMS Larne 539 730 The Admiralty's 1909-10 Programme for destroyers consisted of the 20 Acorn-class units. Thornycroft built four of these. Larne and Lyra were sold for scrap in 1921, Martin in 1920, while Minstrel became the Japanese Sendan in 1917, returned in 1919 and scrapped in 1921.[17]  
HMS Lyre 540 730
HMS Martin 541 730
HMS Minstrel 542 730
1911 HMS Acheron 559 773 The Admiralty's 1910-11 Programme for destroyers consisted of the 23 Acheron-class units. Thornycroft built two of these. HMS Acheron was sold in 1921. HMS Ariel was converted to a fast minelayer in 1917 and was lost to mines in August 1918.[18]  
1912 HMS Ariel 560 763
1911 Marynthea 567 886 A large steam yacht, built for Henry J. Mason. In 1919 sold to Arthur Du Cros and named Emerald. In 1922 it was acquired by Philip H. du Cross, and in 1926 by Harry Gordon Selfridge, who changed the name to Conqueror. In 1934 the yacht was sold to Hugh Cunliffe-Owen and in 1939 to the Marwell Sailing Company Ltd. In 1947 she was registered in Panama as the Patris, owned by Lamira Cia de Vapores SA. In 1948 she was registered in Greece as the Marie, owned by G.P.Hadoulis & Partners, and in 1949 as the Costakis Toyias, owned by Evangelos Toyias- Finally in 1960 she became the Marilena, owned by S. Lagos. Broken up in 1979.  
1911 Catherine Lawrence 616 119 Two tugs, sold to Chile, and registered in Antofagasta.
Alida Harvey 617 117
1913 HMS Hardy 621 898 The Admiralty's 1911-12 Programme for destroyers consisted of the 20 Acasta-class units. Thornycroft built five of these. HMS Hardy was sold in 1921, HMS Paragon was torpedoed by a German destroyer in March 1917. HMS Porpoise was sold to Brazil in 1920 as the Alexandrino Deaenca, changed in 1927 to Maranhao. Discarded in 1945.[19] HMS Unity was sold in 1922 and HMS Victor in 1923.[20]  
HMS Paragon 633 917
1914 HMS Porpoise 634 934
HMS Unity 635 954
HMS Victor 636 954
1913 St. Patrick 663 341 Passenger and cargo steamer, built for the Government of Trinidad and registered in Port of Spain. In 1931 she was sold to CA Venezolana de Nav in Ciudad Bolivar and renamed Casacoima. Deleted in 1951.
1914 HMS Lance 653 997 The Admiralty's 1912-13 Programme for destroyers consisted of the 20 Laforey-class units (Later known as the L-class). Thornycroft built two of these. HMS Lance is credited with having fired the first shot of the Naval War in World War I. On August 5, 1914 she sank the German minelayer Königin Louise, which was caught while laying mines in the Thames estuary. Scrapped 1921 and 1922 respectively.[21][22]  
HMS Lookout 654 1,002
1914 CGS Margaret 679 756 A customs vessel for the Government of Canada. In August 1914 she was transferred to the Canadian Navy and became the patrol vessel HMCS Margaret. Went back to customs work in 1919. Sold to Brazil in 1932 and became the surveying ship Rio Branco. Did patrol work in the Second World War. Discarded in 1957 or 1958.  
1914 HMS Meteor 696 1,070 Thornycroft built their own version of the Admiralty's M-class destroyer design, the six units known as the Thornycroft M-class destroyers. HMS Meteor and HMS Mastiff were sold in 1921. HMS Patrician and HMS Patriot were transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in 1920. Both broken up in 1929. HMS Rapid was sold in 1927 and HMS Ready in 1926.[23][24]  
HMS Mastiff 697 1,070
1916 HMS Patrician 805 1,004
HMS Patriot 806 1,004
HMS Rapid 827 1,033
HMS Ready 828 1,033
1914 Ona 723 345 Two tugs for the Navy of Argentina. They were given the pennant numbers R-9 and R-10. Ona was probably phased out in the 1960s, while her sister was broken up around 1971.[25]
Querandi 724 345
1915 Sprite 761 414 A tug for the Royal Navy.
1915 Veteran 768 690 A tug for the Royal Navy.
1915 HMS Michael 773 1,003 Thornycroft built six of the standard Admiralty M-class destroyers. All were sold for scrap in 1921.[26]  
HMS Milbrook 774 1,007
HMS Minion 775 1,007
1916 HMS Munster 776 1,001
HMS Nepean 789 1,025
HMS Nereus 790 1,025
1916 HMS F-3 751 353 Thornycroft built one of the three F-class submarines for the Royal Navy. It was broken up in 1920.[27]
1916 Pert 764 1,023 A tug for the Royal Navy.
1916 HMS E33 784 662 Thornycroft built two units of the E-class of submarines for the Royal Navy. HMS E33 was sold in 1922 and HMS E34 was mined in July 1918.[28]  
1917 HMS E34 785 658
1916 HMS Rosalind 850 1,037 Thornycroft built their own version of the Admiralty's R-class destroyer design, the five units known as the Thornycroft R-class destroyers. HMS Teazer did just over 40 knots on her trials in 1917, making her the fastest destroyer in the World at the time.[29] HMS Rosalind was sold for scrap in 1926 and HMS Radiant was sold to the Thai Navy in 1920 and became the Phra Ruang, serving until the middle of the 1960s. HMS Retriever was sold in 1927, HMS Taurus in 1930 and HMS Teazer in 1931.[30]  
1917 HMS Radiant 851 1,035
HMS Retriever 852 1,034
HMS Taurus 871 1,065
HMS Teazer 872 1,065
1917 HMS Shakespeare 903 1,750 Admiral Jellicoe of the Royal Navy was concerned that the light cruisers of the day were not fast enough to lead the destroyer flotillas. On his request Thornycroft built five Flotilla Leaders - first three shown here - which were larger and better armed than conventional destroyers. HMS Shakespeare and HMS Spenser were sold for scrap in 1936, but HMS Wallace served on until 1945.[31][32]  
HMS Spenser 904 1,750
1919 HMS Wallace 965 1,750
1917 HMS Hyderabad 966 595 Gunboat for the Royal Navy. In 1921 sold to civilian service and became the Greek freighter Lemnos.
1918 HMS Viceroy 929 1,120 Thornycroft also built their own version of the Admiralty's V & W-class destroyer design, the four units known as the Thornycroft V and W-class destroyers. HMS Viceroy was sold in 1948, HMS Viscount in 1945, HMS Wolsey and HMS Woolston in 1947.[33]  
HMS Viscount 930 1,120
HMS Wolsey 953 1,120
HMS Woolston 954 1,120
1918 HMS Speedy 961 1,092 The Admiralty's S-class also had a Thornycroft version, the five units known as the Thornycroft S-class destroyers. HMS Speedy was sunk in a collision in September 1922, and HMS Tobago was mined in November 1920. HMS Torbay and HMS Toreador were transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in 1928 and became HMCS Champlain and Vancouver, and broken up in 1937. HMS Tourmaline was sold in 1931.[34]  
HMS Tobago 962 1,092
1919 HMS Torbay 968 1,092
HMS Toreador 969 1,092
HMS Tourmaline 970 1,092
1919 HMS Roysterer 967 839 A Rollicker class rescue tug for the Royal Navy.
1920 HMS Wishart 978 1,140 Thornycroft also built their own version of the Admiralty's Modified W class. The second unit, HMS Witch, was launched at Woolston in 1919, but was later towed to the HM Dockyard at Devonport and eventually completed there in 1924. Sold for breaking up in 1945 and 1946, respectively.[35]
1924 HMS Witch 979 1,140
1920 Meandros 986 2,498 A cargo ship, delivered to the Greek National Steamship Company, based at Andros. Sold to the Norwegian Nidaros shipping company in 1925 and renamed as the Nidarholm. From 1931 she was registered in Finland.
1920 Ville de Saint Amarin 987 1,425 Two cargo steamers, built for the Groupement Industriel de Charbons et de Transports in Rouen, France. The Ville de Saint Amarin was sold to owners in Cardiff in 1922 and was subsequently named Tudor King, Liverpool Rover and Roverlock. In 1948 she was sold to Chinese owners as the An Lien. The Ville de Dannemarie went to Newcastle as the Greatend in 1921, and was sold to Spain in 1941 as the Castillo Norena and later Margara.
Ville de Dannemarie 988 1,424
1921 Elizabeth Stoner 990 2,498 This cargo ship was delivered to J. Stoner & Co. in Southampton in 1921, sold the following year to the Scindia Steam Navigation Company Ltd., being renamed as the Jalatarang in 1923. She was sunk by the Japanese submarine I-64 in the vicinity of Rangoon on January 30, 1942.  
1921 Sir James Bell 991 2,496 A cargo steamer for the Belleview Shipping Company in Hull. In 1931 it was sold to Curt Mattson in Helsinki and named Aldebaran. In 1933 it was sold again, this time to the Baltic Shipping Company in Leningrad, and named Kotlin.
1921 St. Senan 992 515 Two cargo ships for Cargo Steamships Co Ltd in Southampton. St. Senan was sold to A.F.Henry & MacGregor Ltd in Leith in 1925 and named Dunnet Head. Slievenamon was sold to John S.Monks Ltd in Liverpool in 1924 and named Monksville.
Slievenamon 993 514
1921 Sjømand 997 2,820 A steam tanker for the Norwegian A/S Laboremus in Oslo. The original steam turbines were replaced with a Norwegian-built steam engine in 1927. Sold in 1933 to the Peruvian Navy and named Parinas. Scrapped in 1961.[36]
1921 Liscard 1004 734 Two luggage boats for the Borough of Wallasey at Liverpool. Liscard was converted to a floating crane and taken over by the Government in 1943. In 1946 it was sold to the D/S Hetland A/S in Copenhagen, converted to a salvage vessel and renamed as the Lisca. Taken over by Henry Andersen in 1949 and by K.H. Andersen in 1952. In 1956 sold to Eisen u.Metall KG Lehr & Co of Hamburg as the Gluckauf. Ownership passed to Eisen u.Metall AG z/n Hamburg in 1960. Broken up in 1965. IMO 5132573. Leasowe had a less eventful career, being sold for scrap in 1948.[37]  
Leasowe 1005 734
1922 Bellasco 994 2,494 A cargo steamship for the Dover Shipping Company Ltd. in Hull. In 1933 sold to the Norwegian Wallem & Co A/S and named Moviken. In 1934 sold to China as the Chung Hsing. Became the Japanese Hengshan Maru in 1938. Registered in Taiwan from 1949, first as the Yuan Hsing and from 1950 as the An Lung.
1921 Maid of Spetsai 1000 1,511 Two cargo ships for the Byron Steamship Company Ltd in London. Maid of Spetsai was lost in a collision in January 1924. Maid of Hydra was sold to Soc. Naviera Chilena de Transportes in Valparaiso, Chile, in 1927 and named Republica. She was lost in a fire in July 1928.
1922 Maid of Hydra 1001 1,511
1922 Llys-Helig 1013 157 A motor yacht, built for W.E. Corlett.
1923 Canute 1014 271 A tug, launched in December 1922 and completed in February 1923.
1924 Luna 1024 242 Two diesel-engine lightships for the Port of Calcutta
Star 1025 242
1924 Neptuno 1027 122 A tug for Brazil
1924 Pioneer 1028 281 A pilot vessel, launched in May 1924 and delivered in August of that year.
1924 Koodoo 1029 119 A tug, launched in June 1924 and delivered in August of that year. Scuttled in 1960.
1924 Jamnagar 1030 576 A cargo steamship, delivered to the Maharajah Jam Sahib of Nawanagar. In 1944 taken over by the British Government as the Empire Bulbul. In 1947 sold to Greek owners, named Hellenic Bulbul and based in Hong Kong for the China Hellenic Lines Ltd. Wrecked in 1948.
1924 Satellite 1033 491 A steam-powered buoy- and lighthouse tender, built for the Corporation of the Trinity House. Broken up in 1962.
1924 Ether 1036 101 A small diesel-engine tanker, built for Salamon & Co in Great Britain.
1924 Shanklin 1037 412 A paddle-steamer for the Southern Railway, ferrying passengers between Portsmouth Harbour and Ryde Pier. Sold to Cosens & Co Ltd in 1951 and renamed Monarch. Taken out of service 1961 and scrapped.  
1924 Southend Britannia 1038 147 A diesel-engine passenger ship for the Britannia Motor Boat Company in Southend-on-Sea. She was one of the small ships that took part in the Dunkirk evacuation.[38]
1924 Sir William Macintosh 1039 226 Steam-engine tug, delivered to the Department of Railways & Harbours in South Africa, and based in Port Elizabeth. In 1937 the tug was sold to the James Dredging, Towage & Transport Co Ltd, being named Protea in 1938. Later in 1938, she was sold to the Tees Towing Company Ltd, renamed Euston Cross, and based in Middlesbrough. From 1960 she had Greek owners, was based in Piraeus and named respectively Thiseus, Ioannis Matsas and Thiseus again. Broken up in Greece in 1981.
1925 HMS Keppel 982 1,750 The last two Thornycroft Leaders were both launched in 1920 (Broke as the Rooke, renamed 1921), but then work stopped. They were completed at Pembroke Dock in 1925. Keppel was broken up in 1945 and Broke sank after sustaining artillery fire in November 1942.[39]  
HMS Broke 983 1,750
1925 Beacon 1042 490 A steam-powered buoy- and lighthouse tender, built for the Corporation of the Trinity House. Broken up in 1960.
1925 Fushun 1043 577 A passenger and cargo steamer, built for Fung K. Yu of Southampton. Registered in Italy 1927 and in Bremen 1928. From 1930 based in Shanghai, first as the Fooshun and from 1932 as the Ming Chu. Not mentioned after 1945.
1926 Clausentum 1049 268 A tug, based in Southampton.
1926 Kassed Kheir 1050 1,330 A large paddle-steamer yacht, built for the Government of Egypt.
1926 Imbuhy 1060 480 A ferry for the Cia Cantereira e Viacao Fluminense in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
1926 Portman 1061 335 A diesel-engine cargo ship for Argentina, registered in Buenos Aires. Deleted in 1986.
1927 HMS Amazon 1040 1,352 Built as a prototype for new destroyer construction for the Royal Navy (along with Yarrow's competing HMS Ambuscade). The Amazon design was chosen. Broken up in 1948.[40]  
1927 El Buaro 1062 259 A small tanker for Ecuador.
1928 Estácio Coimbra 1080 271 A tug for Brazil.
1928 Serrano 1073 1,090 The six Serrano-class destroyers were built for the Navy of Chile, and were based on Thornycroft's design of the Amazon. The Aldea was discarded in 1957, Videla in 1960, Hyatt and Riquelme in 1963, and Serrano and Orella in 1967.[41]  
1929 Orella 1074 1,090
Riquelme 1075 1,090
Hyatt 1076 1,090
Videla 1077 1,090
Aldea 1078 1,090
1929 Martinetta 1087 99 A motor yacht built for A.G. Lomax. In 1971 it was sold to the Government of Fiji and renamed Vola Silga.
1929 Rosa 1088 400 Motor yacht, built for the Spanish count Ramón Godó.
1928 Bovril 1081 270 Two cargo motor-ships for the Argentine Estates of Bovril Ltd, registered in Buenos Aires. Duke of Atholl was sold to Frigorifico Regional Santa Elena SA in 1974.
1930 Duke of Atholl 1104 270
1930 Robert Coryndon 1086 205 This steamship was built as a passenger and cargo ferry for service on Lake Albert. It was launched in 1929 and then taken apart and shipped to Africa. It was wrecked in 1962 and the hull was not removed from the shore of the lake.  
1930 Calshot 1093 679 Built as a tug tender for the Southampton Isle of Wight and South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Company Limited. In 1940 she was taken over by the Royal Navy as HMS Calshot, and she was present as one of the headquarter ships at Juno Beach at the Normandy landings. Returned to the owners at the end of WW II. In 1964 she was sold to Port & Liner Services (Ireland) Ltd and was based at Galway and renamed Galway Bay. In 1986 she was bought by the Southampton City Council and registered there, getting her old name Calshot back in 1990. Preserved as part of the National Historic Fleet.[42]  
1930 Itororo 1096 316 Two diesel-engine water tankers for Cia Docas de Santos in Santos, Brazil. Itororo was broken op in 1955, and Pilões was hulked in 1950.
Pilões 1097 316
1930 Anna Marie 1099 337 Motor yacht, built for Danish industrialist Valdemar Graae. In 1931 she was acquired by W.E. Corlett and renamed Llys Helig. Taken over by the Royal Navy in 1939 and renamed HMS Anna Marie (FY 004). In 1941 she was named HMS Torrent. Mined and sunk off Falmouth in April 1941.[43]
1930 Tobago 1106 537 Steamship for the government of Trinidad. Transported passengers and cargo between the islands until sold in 1958 and 1959 to other owners, still registered in Port of Spain. Abandoned in 1963. IMO 5607256.
1931 HMS Acheron 1083 1,350 This was Thornycroft's contribution to the A- and B-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. Struck a mine and sank in December 1940.[44]  
1931 HMCS Saguenay 1091 1,337 Two destroyers for Canada, similar to the Royal Navy A- and B-class destroyers. Saguenay was paid off in 1945 and broken up in 1946. Skeena ran aground in a storm at Iceland in October 1944, and was lost.[45]  
HMCS Skeena 1092 1,337
1931 Medina 1105 342 A motor-engine passenger ship for Southampton Isle of Wight and South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Company Limited. Sold to M.H.Bland & Co Ltd in Gibraltar in 1962 and renamed Mons Abyla. Taken over by the Government of Gibraltar in 1968. For a short period in 1972 she was registered in London, but later that year sold to Marilu Intermediterranean Tpt Sg SA in Panama and renamed Marilu.[46]
1932 HMS Daring 1107 1,375 These two destroyers were Thornycrofts part of the C and D-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. Daring was torpedoed and sunk in February 1940. Decoy became HMCS Kootenay in 1943 and was scrapped in 1946.[47]  
1933 HMS Decoy 1108 1,375
1933 Trenora 1115 856 Motor yacht built for the surgeon Ernest Gerald Stanley. He later sold it to the Duke of Sutherland, who renamed it Sans Peur. In 1939 it was taken over by the Royal Canadian Navy and fitted out as an armed yacht. She was sold to private owners in 1947.
1934 HMS Sandpiper 1112 185 This river gunboat was dismantled upon completion and dispatched to Singapore, where it was assembled in 1934 for service on the Yangtze. Transferred to Nationalist China in 1942 and named Ying Hao. Taken over by the People's Republic of China after 1948. Discarded after 1970.[48][49][50]  
1934 HMS Harrier 1117 815 Two minesweepers of the Halcyon class for the Royal Navy. HMS Harrier was discarded in the late 1940s and HMS Hussar was sunk in error by the RAF in August 1944.[51]  
1935 HMS Hussar 1118 815
1935 La Dryade 1133 152 Motor passenger ship, built for French owners.
1936 HMS Glowworm 1125 1,350 These two destroyers constituted Thornycroft's part of the G and H-class destroyers of the Royal Navy. Both were lost in 1940.[52]  
HMS Grafton 1126 1,350
1936 Gracie Fields 1149 393 A paddle-wheel passenger ship for Southampton Isle of Wight and South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Company Limited. She was sunk in May 1940 while taking part in the Dunkirk evacuation.[53]
1936 Amazone 1154 222 A motor yacht for the Belgian officer Leon Hemeleers-Shenley.
1937 HMS Kittiwake 1152 530 Thornycroft built two of the small Kingfisher-class sloops. After World War II, they were sold to civilian use in 1946 as Tuch Shing and Tuch Loon.[54]  
HMS Sheldrake 1153 530
1937 Tadorna 1172 226 A motor yacht for Dutch owners (G.& W.Miesegaes).
1938 HMS Mohawk 1158 1,960 Thornycroft built two of the 27 large Tribal-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. Mohawk was torpedoed by an Italian destroyer in April 1941, while Nubian survived the war and was sold for scrapping in 1949.[55]  
HMS Nubian 1159 1,960
1938 Shemara 1175 878 Motor yacht, built for the industrialist Bernard Docker. Taken over by the Royal Navy in 1939 as HMS Shemara, and served until 1946, when it was returned to its owners. Had major refit in 1992, and again in 2010-4, and is still in use a motor yacht.[56][57]  
1938 Lasso 1176 910 Cable ship for the Royal Navy. Broken up in 1946.
1939 HMS Pelican 1177 1,250 Thornycroft built one of the three Egret-class sloops for the Royal Navy. Saw extensive anti-submarine service in World War II. Broken up in 1958.[58]  
1939 HMS Kashmir 1178 1,690 Thornycroft built two of the eight K-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. Kashmir was sunk by German bombers at Crete in May 1941, while Kimberley survived the war and was sold for scrap in 1949.[59]  
1940 HMS Kimberley 1179 1,690
1940 HMS Hesperus 1185 1,370 Thornycroft built two of the six Jurua class destroyers ordered by Brazil, and identical to the British H-class. In September all six of the class (still building) were taken over by the Royal Navy. Juruena was launched August 1, 1939 and completed in January 1940 as HMS Hearthy. The name was changed to HMS Hesperus in February 1941. Highlander was launched October 19, 1939 and completed in March 1940. Both saw extensive wartime service, and were broken up in 1947.[60]  
HMS Highlander 1186 1,370
1941 HMS Latona 1198 2,650 Thornycroft built one of the six Abdiel-class minelayers for the Royal Navy. She was the largest Thornycroft-built warship of the war and had a short service life, sunk by enemy aircraft while supporting the garrison at Tobruk in October 1941.[61]  
1941 Sivrihisar 1200 350 Two minelayers for the Navy of Turkey. Yuzbasi Hakki was renamed Torgud Reis in 1940. Both were discarded in 1964.[62][63]
Yuzbasi Hakki 1201 350
1941 HMAS Norman 1202 1,773 The yard at Woolston built two of the eight N-class destroyers. Both were loaned to Australia and served the war in the Far East. Norman was sold in 1958 and Nepal (launched as Norseman) in 1955.[64]  
1942 HMAS Nepal 1203 1,773
1941 HMS Lauderdale 1212 1,050 These two units were Thornycroft's part of the Hunt class Type II production. Lauderdale became the Greek Aigaion in 1946, serving until 1959 and scrapped in 1960. HMS Ledbury distinguished herself in Operation Pedestal and was finally sold for scrap in 1958.[65]  
1942 HMS Ledbury 1213 1,050
1942 HMS Opportune 1210 1,560 Thornycroft built two of the eight O-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. Both saw extensive wartime service. HMS Opportune was sold for scrap in 1955, while HMS Orwell was converted to a Type 16 frigate (with pennant F98) in 1952-1953, and finally sold for scrap in 1965.[66]  
HMS Orwell 1211 1,560
1942 HMS Brecon 1290 1,194 Thornycroft built these two vessels as their own version of the Hunt-class destroyer, known as the Type IV. Brecon was sold for scrap in 1961 and broken up the following year. Brissenden was scrapped in 1965.[67]  
1943 HMS Brissenden 1,194
1943 HMIS Narbada 1385 1,300 The original Black Swan-class of sloops (frigates) comprised 12 units. Thornycroft delivered two, both to the Navy of India, for service in the Far East. The spelling of the second unit can be seen as both Godavari and Godaveri. After the partition of India, they became part of the Navy of Pakistan in 1948, renamed as the Jhelum and the Sind. They were discarded in 1959.[68]  
HMIS Godaveri 1386 1,300
1943 HMS Magpie 4016 1,350 The modified Black Swan-class of sloops (frigates) eventually comprised 25 units. Thornycroft delivered three, of which two were delivered in time to take part in the hunt for German submarines. The first two were sold for scrap in 1959 and 1958 respectively, while Actaeon was sold to West Germany in 1958. It served as the Hipper until hulked in 1964. Sold for scrap in 1967.[69]  
1944 HMS Peacock 4017 1,350
1946 HMS Actaeon 4033 1,350
1943 HMS Undine 4023 1,806 These two were Thornycroft's part of the eight U-class destroyers. In 1952-1954 Undine was converted into a Type 15 fast frigate, with pennant number F141. Ursa was similarly converted in 1953-1954, receiving pennant number F200. They were scrapped in 1965 and 1967 respectively.[70]  
1944 HMS Ursa 4024 1,806
1944 HMS Zest 4034 1,730 Among the eight units of the Z-class destroyers were these two, built by Thornycroft. In 1954-1956 Zest was converted into a Type 15 fast frigate, with pennant number F102. She was sold in 1969 and broken up in 1970. Zodiac was sold to the Navy of Israel in 1955, renamed as the Yaffo and served until 1972. One of her 4.5"-guns is preserved at the Clandestine Immigration and Naval Museum, Haifa.[71]  
HMS Zodiac 4035 1,730
1944 HMS LCT 7035 4078 350 Not much is known about this Mark 3 Landing craft tank, launched at Thornycroft's on April 26, 1944.[72][73]
1945 HMS Chaplet 4048 1,740 Thornycroft built two of eight destroyers of the Ch subgroup - a part of the 32 C-class destroyers. Both were delivered after the end of World War II. Chaplet received new anti-submarine weapons in 1954 and was scrapped in 1965. Charity was sold to U.S.A. in 1958 and immediately transferred to Pakistan as the Shah Jahan. During the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 it was badly damaged by a Styx missile from INS Nipat. Although towed back to Karachi, the destroyer was found to be damaged beyond repair and was scrapped.[74]  
HMS Charity 4049 1,740
1946 HMS Comus 4050 1,915 Thornycroft built two of eight destroyers of the Co subgroup - a part of the 32 C-class destroyers. Both were delivered after the end of World War II. Comus served in the Korean War and in the Malayan Emergency before being srapped in 1958. Concord was launched as the Corso, but renamed in 1946 before entering service. She took part in the Amethyst Incident and the Korean war. Concord was scrapped in 1962.[75]  
HMS Concord 4051 1,915
1947 El Malek Fouad 4108 3,746 A passenger and cargo ship for the Khedivial Mail S.S. Company. In 1956 she was renamed as the Nefertiti, and in 1961 sold to Tirrenia – Compagnia italiana di navigazione in Naples and given the name Olbia, (IMO 5262079). Scrapped in 1972.
1948 HMS Crossbow 4074 1,980 Of the twenty Weapon-class destroyers ordered, Thornycroft were allotted four. A series of cancellations meant that only two of these, Crossbow and Culverin were launched, and only Crossbow was completed. In 1957-1959 the torpedo armament gave way to a large lattice mast with radar, enabling the ship to serve as radar picket for a carrier strike force. Sold for scrap in December 1971, arriving at the breakers in January 1972.[76]  
1948 Commandant Quéré 4114 4,478 Built for the Compagnie Générale Transatlantique for service in the Mediterranean, primarily between Corsica and the French mainland. Scrapped in 1969.[77]
1949 Atlas 4115 500 Two tugs for the colonial government of Nigeria, based at Lagos. In 1957 both were transferred to the Nigerian Ports Authority. Atlas foundered 9 nmi East of Lagos in August 1967. Vulcan was sold to Tsavliris (Salvage & Towage) Ltd in Piraeus in 1967, renamed Nisos Thasos, and was scrapped there in 1970.
Vulcan 4116 500
1949 Stalwart 4117 456 A tug, built for the Calcutta Port Trust. IMO number 5337915. Not much information online - might still be floating.
1949 Balmoral 4120 688 A car- and passenger ferry for the Red Funnel Line, used between Southampton and Cowes. Sold to P & A Campbell in 1979 and based in Bristol. In 1983 she was acquired by Craig Inns and intended for use as a floating restaurant. The project was abandoned, and Balmoral went back to the Bristol Channel in 1985, now owned by Helseam Ltd. In 1995 she was bought by the Waverley SN Co Ltd, and became part of the National Historic Fleet. In 2015 ownership was transferred to MV Balmoral Fund Limited.  
1949 Atile 4122 193 A tug, built for Anglo Saxon Petroleum. Not much information online.
1951 Ucayali 4126 320 Two river gunboats for the Peruvian Navy. Pennant numbers CF-14 and CF-13 respectively.
Marañón 4127 320
1952 HMS Duchess 4087 2,950 The yard at Woolston built one of the eight Daring-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. In 1964 she was loaned to the Royal Australian Navy, and later bought outright. Converted to training ship 1973-1974. Left active service in 1977 and was sold for scrap in 1980.[78]  
1951 Blenheim 4123 4,766 Two passenger/cargo ships, launched at Thornycroft's and completed by Akers (Yard No. 490 and 494) in Oslo, Norway. Owned by Ganger Rolf ASA (a subsidiary of Fred. Olsen & Co. Both served on the Olso-Kristiansand-Newcastle route, but Blenheim sustained heavy damage from a fire in 1968, and in 1969 was sold to A/S Uglands Rederi, Grimstad, Norway. Converted to car carrier (2,466 GRT) and renamed Cilaos. In 1973 sold to Ocean Car Carriers Pte Ltd in Singapore (IMO 5046334). Sold for scrap 1981 and broken up.[79] Braemar served in Norway until 1973, when she was sold to Dashwood Finance Co Ltd of Manilla and renamed as The Philippine Tourist. (IMO 5050074). Laid up as a floating casino in 1976, and further fate is sparsely documented.[80]  
1953 Braemar 4145 4,766
1953 Horus 4134 337 Thornycroft sold this tug to the Cie Universelle du Canal Maritime de Suez, home port Port Said. After the Suez channel was nationalized, it was transferred to the Suez Canal Authority in 1958. Deleted in 1996. (IMO 5155331).
1953 Vigilant 4141 728 A salvage vessel, built for the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board in Liverpool. In 1978 the name was changed to Staunch and the ship was broken up the same year. (IMO 5380170).
1953 Hamtun 4151 318 A tug, owned by the shipyard until 1959, when it was bought by the Red Funnel Line, also at Southampton. In 1970 she was bought by Union de Remorquage et de Sauvetage SA in Antwerp, who in 1972 named her Nathalie Letzer. In 1974 she was rebuilt and rated at 394 GRT. In 1987 she was back in Britain, as the Anglican Lady, owned by Klyne Tugs (Lowestoft) Ltd. In 1991, the tug went to Sault Ste Marie in Canada, now owned by Purvis Marine Ltd. (IMO 5141483). Apparently still active.[81]
1953 Sir Bevois 4158 318 This tug was very similar to the Hamtun, and similarly owned by the shipyard until 1959, when it was bought by the Red Funnel Line, also at Southampton. In 1968 she was bought by the John Howard & Co (Northern) Ltd in Liverpool and named Amanda Howard. Broken up in 1970. (IMO 5329437)
1955 Sechura 4159 4,297 A tanker for the Navy of Peru, pennant number ATP-54, commissioned in 1956. In 1968 sold to Veneziatankers Sas in Venice and named Monte Grappa. In 1976 sold to Francesco Saverio Salonia in Rome and named Micheleesse. Sold for scrap in 1981. (IMO 5317070)
1955 Barana 4162 361 A tug for the government of Sri Lanka, based in Colombo. The engine broke down in 1991, and she was subsequently scrapped. (IMO 5036171)
1956 Scillonian 4130 921 A ferry for the Isles of Scilly Steamship Company, transporting passengers and cargo between the Isles of Scilly and Penzance, Cornwall. In 1977, she was bought by P.& A.Campbell of Bristol and named Devonia. In 1982 sold to John Graham & Maureen M.Thompson of Glasgow and named Devonium. Later that same year sold to Torbay Seaways & Stevedores Ltd, who reverted the name to Devonia. In 1984 she was sold to Norse Atlantic Ferries Ltd and became the Syllingar, serving at the Orkney Islands. In 1986 she became the Remvi, now owned by the Hellenic Cruising Holidays in Piraeus. In 1989 she was sold to J.A.R.Atlantic Ocean Ltd of Belize, renamed Africa Queen, serving in West Africa. The name was changed to Princess Eliana in 1997. In 1998, she became the Olga J. owned by John Christodoulo of Belize. He abandoned her and the crew in Bourgas, Bulgaria in 1999 and she was eventually hulked there in 2007. (IMO 5315723).[82]  
1956 Atherfield 4163 246 Two tugs for the Red Funnel Line in Southampton. Atherton became Irwing Hemlock in 1972 and Swellmaster in 1996, employed in Canada. Latest sighting January 2017. (IMO 5028605).[83] Culver is also referred to as a fire fighting vessel. (IMO 5082895). Not much else available onine.
Culver 4164 246
1953 HMS Coniston 4135 360 Among the 117 Ton-class minesweepers delivered to the Royal Navy were 12 built by Thornycroft.
  • Coniston was sold to the salvage company Metrec Ltd in 1970, and became the Investic. Broken up in 1973.
  • Alcaston became the Australian HMAS Snipe in 1961 and was broken up in 1988.
  • Alfriston was RNR Warsash 1954-1958 and RNR Kilmorey 1961-1975, reverting to her old name and broken up in 1988.
  • Derriton was RNR Killiekrankie 1955-1960 and broken up 1971.
  • Oulston was sold to the Irish Naval Service in 1971, renamed LÉ Grainne (CM10). Sold for scrap 1987.
  • Highburton was sold for scrap in 1978.
  • Hickleton served in the Navy of New Zealand 1965-1966. Sold to Argentina in 1967, and became ARA Neuquen (M1). Discarded 1996.
  • Blaxton was sold to the Irish Naval Service in 1971, renamed LÉ Fola (CM12). Sold for scrap 1987.
  • Bossington was scrapped in Belgium in 1989.
  • Upton was scrapped in Belgium in 1991.
  • Walkerton was broken up in Middlesbrough in 1990.
  • Crofton was an RNR tender 1969-1975, carrying the name Warsash. Broken up 1987.[84]
 
HMS Alcaston 4136 360
1954 HMS Alfriston 4137 360
HMS Derriton 4152 360
1955 HMS Oulston 4153 360
HMS Highburton 4154 360
HMS Hickleton 4155 360
1956 HMS Blaxton 4156 360
HMS Bossington 4157 360
HMS Upton 4160 360
1958 HMS Walkerton 4161 360
HMS Crofton 4173 360
1957 HMS Blackwood 4149 1,200 The yard built two of the 12 Blackwood-class frigates ordered by the Royal Navy. Blackwood was originally equipped with four 21-inch anti-submarine torpedoes. Broken up in 1976. Duncan was relegated to harbour service in the early 1980s, decommissioned in 1984 and scrapped in 1985.[85]  
1958 HMS Duncan 4150 1,200
1958 SAS Windhoek 4174 360 A Ton-class minesweeper, built for the South African Navy. No longer active, but fate unknown.[86]
1958 Dunnose 4182 241 A tug for the Red Funnel line of Southampton. In 1980 renamed Irving Willow of the Atlantic Towing Ltd in Canada, and in 1996 Wavemaster. IMO 5094953. Broken up 2005.[87]
1959 Carisbrooke Castle 4183 672 A ferry for the Red Funnel line of Southampton, connecting Southampton and West Cowes. In 1974 she was sold to the Societa Partenopea di Navigazione S.p.A., Naples and renamed Citta di Meta, serving between Naples and Ischia. In 1978 she was sold to Soc Campania Regionale Marittima SpA, also in Naples. In 1987 she was sold to Maregiglio S.r.l., Naples, for service between Porto Santo Stefano and Isola del Giglio, and she was named Giglio Expresso II in 1989. In 2001 ownership passed to Trasporti Regionali Marittimi Srl, connecting Calasetta and Carloforte (off the coast of Sardinia), and in 2006 to MF Maddalena Ferry Srl in Genova, before she was finally broken up in 2007. IMO 5063681.[88]  
1960 HMNZ Otago 4172 2,150 A Rothesay-class frigate, ordered by the Royal Navy in 1956 as the Hastings, but the order was taken over by New Zealand in 1957, and she was built as the Otago. She was paid off in 1983 and sold for scrap in 1987.[89]  
1960 Keverne 4189 260 A tug for J.P. Knight Ltd. Became the Vaya con Dios in 1987, March in 2004 and Cosan I in 2009. IMO 5186031.  
1960 Gatcombe 4192 513 A tug for the Red Funnel Line of Southampton. Sold to the Bermuda Marine & Port Authority in 1969 and renamed Bermudian. Became the Topsham in 1988, owned by Peninsular Sg Co Ltd. In 1989 sold to Splendid Sg Ltd of Valetta, Malta, and renamed Royal M.. Broken up in Greece in 2003. IMO 5126627.
1961 Thorness 4194 247 A tug for the Red Funnel Line of Southampton. Became the Irving Juniper in 1984, and the Atlantic Juniper in 1999, based in Canada. IMO 5360106.
1962 Osborne Castle 4196 736 A ferry for the Red Funnel Line, serving between Southampton and Cowes. Became the Le Gobelet D'Argent in Canada in 1978. Renamed Le Maxim in 1989 and Cavalier Maxim in 1993. IMO 5265904.[90]
1963 HMS Gurkha 4180 2,300 Thornycroft delivered one of the seven Tribal class frigates. In 1984 she was sold to Indonesia and became the Wilhelmus Zakarias Yohannes, discarded in 2000.[91]  
1963 Ikwerre 4200 289 Two apparently identical tugs. Ikwerre was delivered to the Nigerian Ports Authority in Lagos, Nigeria. (IMO 5411723). Nguvu went to the East African Railwys & Harbours, later registered in Tanzania. (IMO 5412739).
Nguvu 4201 289
1964 Calshot 4202 493 A tug/tender for the Red Funnel Line of Southampton. Sold to Antrefo Supplies Ltd of Southampton in 1987. Became the Tara II of Dublin in 1989, owned by Dublin Bay Cruises (Ireland) Ltd. Finally, in 1992, she became the Boluda Abrego of Valencia, owned by Remolques del Mediterraneo SA. Broken up in Turkey in 2012. IMO 6402717.
1965 Chale 4208 254 A tug for the Red Funnel Line of Southampton.
1965 Cowes Castle 4209 786 A ferry for the Red Funnel Line of Southampton. In 1975 she was converted to roll-on/roll-off, with space for 25-30 extra vehicles and measured at 912 tons. In 1993 (or 1994) sold to Javno Poduzece "Jadrolinija" PO of Rijeka, Croatia and renamed Neha. Phased out around 2010 and broken up in Turkey in 2011. IMO 6525002.[92]
1966 Portsmouth Queen 4211 159 Two small ferries for the Portsmouth Harbour Ferry Company, serving its subsidiary Gosport Ferry. Portsmouth Queen was sold in 2016 for service on the Thames as the London Queen. Gosport Queen was sold in 2017 for service on the Thames as the Pearl of London.  
Gosport Queen 4212 159
HMS Juno 4207 2,350 This Leander-class frigate was ordered from Thornycroft and launched at Woolston in 1965, but when she was delivered in 1967, the company had merged into Vosper Thornycroft.
HMS Abdiel 4210 1,375 This minelayer was ordered from Thornycroft, but before she was launched in 1967, the company had merged into Vosper Thornycroft.

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{DEFAULTSORT:Ships built at John I. Thornycroft and Company, Woolston}} [Category:Southampton-built ships| John I. Thornycroft]] [Category:Lists of ships by shipyard|John I. Thornycroft, Woolston]]